Making a Book: It Takes a Village

As I previously wrote on this site, I spent seven years writing my debut novel, THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS DO, out from HarperCollins on January 28. During that time, I sometimes thought about agents, and even met and talked to some. And I knew, theoretically, that there were editors out there who would look at manuscripts like mine and sometimes buy them and turn them into books.

Then I got an agent. And she sold my book to an editor. And I discovered that I had no idea, really none at all, about how vast and complex the publishing world was, and how many hands my manuscript would pass through as it made its way from being a Scrivener document on my computer to a real, beautiful book.

Did you know, for example, that there’s a book designer?! I didn’t.

And a whole team of people who market the book to school and libraries? I didn’t know that either.

I wanted to recognize all of those folks who work so hard to bring books to life, so I interviewed four people who were “behind the scenes” in the making of my debut novel.

They are:

Oriol Vidal, the cover artist.

Courtney Stevenson, my amazing editor.

Cat San Juan, the book designer

and Katie Dutton, my contact on the HarperCollins School & Library Marketing team

Enjoy reading!

Oriol Vidal

1. In a Tweet (186 characters) or a haiku (5/7/5 syllables), describe your professional journey. How did you come to be doing what you’re doing now?

I always liked drawing since I was a kid. I watched a lot of cartoons on TV & was very influenced by them. I had the chance to get a fine arts degree & after started my career as an illustrator. My hobby became my profession.

2. Describe your work space. What do you need to be productive? Music or no music?

I try to have a tidy workspace, with not too much things around. I always listen to music, or radio programs. And a cup of coffee next to me!

3. What is your drink of choice while you work?

Coffee! And I’m a chocolate croissant addict

4. Where do you get inspiration?

From films, mainly. When a project comes in, I Google a lot for references (art pictures, illustrations, photographers… but with a strong film background sense)

5. What do you for fun or in your off hours that is completely different from your professional work?

I try to go out for a walk, into some forest path, or simply going to the park with my daughter.

6. What was your favorite book when you were in middle school?

The Happy Hollisters

7. Who was your best friend in middle school? Are you still in touch?

I grew up with a friend from kindergarten until university. And we are still in touch from time to time!

Courtney Stevenson

1. In a Tweet (186 characters) or a haiku (5/7/5 syllables), describe your professional journey. How did you come to be doing what you’re doing now?

Never stopped reading children’s books, so knew early that’s what I wanted to do: bring stories into the world. (Got my start editing a friend’s Green Day fanfiction.) 6 internships and 2 jobs later, I’m living the dream!

2. Describe your work space. What do you need to be productive? Music or no music?

Have to have space to spread out—as long as the chaos is at least organized into piles! Music with lyrics for paperwork, soundtracks/lo fi for reading, editing, or copy writing. Ideally no email.  Sadly, I do my best focusing after work hours!

3. What is your drink of choice while you work?

Builder’s tea: strong, black, milk and sugar. Or, a froofy Starbucks drink with an extra shot of the good stuff.

4. Where do you get inspiration?

Reading really awesome books (of course). Also, watching all the masterful TV shows that are out now—some incredible storytelling and relationships.

5. What do you for fun or in your off hours that is completely different from your professional work?

I used to be part of a Highland dance troupe! 

6. What was your favorite book when you were in middle school?

So many! I’ve been a Harry Potter nerd from the beginning. I also bought every single book in the Bloody Jack series by L.A. Meyer. Jacky was bold and bright and funny, and I loved her on all her wild adventures.

7. Who was your best friend in middle school? Are you still in touch?

I had the same best friend all through elementary school; we started to grow apart after I moved schools in seventh grade (nightmare time).  I went to her wedding a few years ago, and we text every now and then.

Cat San Juan

1. In a Tweet (186 characters) or a haiku (5/7/5 syllables), describe your professional journey. How did you come to be doing what you’re doing now?

I went to university for journalism but later took up graphic design. In the end, I graduated with both under my belt. I always knew I would work with books one day.

2. Describe your work space. What do you need to be productive? Music or no music?

My desk is decorated with art prints and mini figures and plushies of various pop culture fandoms. A meticulously neat workspace makes me feel productive. Depending on what I’m working on, I listen to music and true crime podcasts if I’m on autopilot. I like silence when I really need to concentrate.

3. What is your drink of choice while you work?

Grande White Chocolate Mocha to get me through the morning. Any fruity drink (particularly strawberry) to get me through the rest of the day.

4. Where do you get inspiration?

Nature, films, music, video games, Pinterest, mom and pop bookstores, watching other people hone their craft, artist alleys at conventions.

5. What do you for fun or in your off hours that is completely different from your professional work?

I like to cosplay characters from my favorite comics/anime/games at cons.

6. What was your favorite book when you were in middle school?

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

7. Who was your best friend in middle school? Are you still in touch?

We lost touch after going to different high schools. LinkedIn tells me she’s a lawyer now.

Katie Dutton

1. In a Tweet (186 characters) or a haiku (5/7/5 syllables), describe your professional journey. How did you come to be doing what you’re doing now?

BA in English. Nanny turned teacher. MA in Children’s Lit. Now I get to combine my passion for KidLit & literacy in a profession where I put books in the hands of teachers & librarians.

2. Describe your work space. What do you need to be productive? Music or no music?

Lots of books! I also like to surround myself with little inspirational reminders – I have a few framed cards sent to me by good friends, photos of my family, a gorgeous flower bouquet made from recycled book pages, some succulents… my work space is not nearly as tidy as it probably should be, to be honest. Music when I need to be in the zone; no music when I want to participate in the conversations around me.

3. What is your drink of choice while you work?

I’m one of those people who constantly has at least two beverages in front of them, and at work it’s usually some combination of coffee, water, and Diet Coke in an endless rotation.

4. Where do you get inspiration?

Teachers and librarians are the most creative, innovative, hard-working, knowledgeable people in the entire world. They’re out there fighting in the trenches every single day to make the world a better place for their students, and they’re the ones I’m always keeping in mind when a new book comes across my path.

5. What do you for fun or in your off hours that is completely different from your professional work?

I love a good game night with friends. I also take krav maga classes as often as I can, which is an amazing (and fun!) way to learn practical self defense while getting a workout in at the same time.

6. What was your favorite book when you were in middle school?

The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster & illustrated by Jules Feiffer; From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, by E.L. Konigsburg; and The Westing Game, by Ellen Raskin (I’ve always been horrible at choosing just one favorite!)

7. Who was your best friend in middle school? Are you still in touch?

In 7th grade I became best friends with a girl named Kimberly, and we remained best friends all through college. We’re not as close today as we used to be, but we still try to get together whenever we can! She’s a high school teacher in Ohio now.

Cathleen Barnhart has been writing her whole life. She wrote her first story she she was seven. It was called “Aunt Ant.” Later, she majored in Creative Writing at Carnegie-Mellon University and then got an M.F.A. in Fiction Writing from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She has held more jobs than she can count, including process camera operator, waitress, perfume salesperson, college writing instructor, and middle school teacher. She is married and has three mostly grown children, an excitable rescue dog named Zeke and a Machiavellian cat named Scout. When she’s not reading, writing, or walking Zeke in the woods, Cathleen fosters kittens and does CrossFit because it’s important to be sensitive and strong. That’s What Friends Do is her first published novel.

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