Converting a Graphic Novel into an Audio Book: Not as Easy as it Sounds

I was thrilled when I heard that Penguin Random House had decided to make an audiobook for Operation Frog Effect. But my first thought was, “What about Blake?” Blake is one of my eight main characters in the book. It’s written from eight POVs, each with his/her unique style. Blake illustrates his entries in graphic novel form. Blake’s sections have minimal words. So . . . I wasn’t sure how an audiobook would work. How could anyone “read” it?

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Art by Gina Perry

Luckily, the audiobook producer (the frog-errific Linda Korn) contacted me on the front end and was ready to help me brainstorm. She suggested we convert all of Blake’s sections into text that could be read out loud. I went back through my illustration notes and fluffed them out into a narrative that described what Blake drew. (To be totally honest, this draft was “meh” at best.) I am so grateful for Linda’s input. She suggested I re-write, not so much describing the illustrations, but as if I were inside Blake’s head in the moment, WHILE he was sketching. I loved this suggestion. Luckily Linda’s office was about an hour away, so we met at a mid-way point, purchased some highly sugared caffeinated beverages, and hashed much of this out together. Working as a team is my favorite. I tend to be the kind of author who gets so caught up in her story that she can’t see the forest for the trees. Having another perspective enriches my work. I’m so grateful that Linda took the time to help me coax Blake’s story from the images into full blown text.

The audiobook producer selected nine different actors to narrate this book. One actor for each character, and one actor to narrate the sections that didn’t fall solidly into a particular character’s voice (like signs, chapter headings, etc.) She selected a diverse cast of actors, which made me oh-so-happy. My characters are equally diverse, so this representation felt authentic to me.

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Art by Gina Perry

The absolute highlight of the audio book experience was being asked to record author commentary for the end of the audio book. Me being me . . .  I prepped. A ton. I brought in my crinkly notepaper, all prepared to read my commentary word for word. Again, I’m grateful for Linda’s guidance and patience. She helped me get comfortable in the recording booth and instructed me to set my papers down and just talk to her. She was aiming for a relaxed commentary that showed my personality, not something prepared ahead of time. I finally relaxed, and once I got on a roll, I almost didn’t want it to end.

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The audio book for Operation Frog Effect releases in late February, 2019. Hope you like it!

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Sarah Scheerger is a school-based counselor in Southern California, helping students figure out who they are, and who they want to be. Her middle grade debut, Operation Frog Effect (Penguin Random House) releases in February but is available for pre-order now. Keep an eye out for her new picture book, “Mitzvah Pizza” (Kar-Ben) which launches in April. In addition to MG and PB’s, Sarah also writes YA. To learn more, visit www.sarahlynnbooks.com.

Cover Reveal: LEXI MAGILL AND THE TELEPORTATION TOURNAMENT by Kim Long

Welcome, Kim! And thanks so much for choosing the MG Book Village to host your cover reveal. We’re thrilled to have you! Before we get to the book and the big reveal, would you care to introduce yourself to our readers?

Hello all! My name is Kim Long and I’m so happy to be here! I’ve followed MG Book Village since the very beginning, and I’m so thrilled to share my cover with you. By day, I work as an attorney, and by night I write MG, mainly contemporary with a magical twist and a dash of science. And baseball! My main character is always a fan of baseball!

Lexi Magill and the Teleportation Tournament is your debut. Could you share with our readers a bit about your journey to the printed page?

I think my journey is a good example of the different (and winding!) paths to publication. I wrote my first MG in 2014 after trunking a pretty bad YA that I’d written and queried in 2013. In spring 2014, I entered an on-line querying contest, Query Kombat, where I had some success and, even more important, was introduced to several MG writers that eventually became valuable CPs. I got an agent with that manuscript, and we went on sub in 2015. By the end of 2015, that manuscript had not sold, but I had finished LEXI MAGILL. My agent then put LEXI on sub in 2016, and, although there were some close calls, by the end of 2016 it also had not sold. At that point, I had written another MG, and after amicably parting ways with my agent, queried that new MG, which led to finding my current agent, Natascha Morris at BookEnds. Even though Nat offered on the new manuscript, she was also interested in LEXI and decided it was worth re-subbing. We did some revisions and put it on sub in October 2017. Again, some interest, but no offers. We started round two of submission in April 2018, and I got the offer of publication in June. All total, I’d written four books and LEXI spent 18 months on sub between two agents before I received an offer of publication!

And now for the book. What’s Lexi Magill and the Teleportation Tournament all about?

The book takes place in our world with the exception that teleportation exists, which makes it easy for people to travel from one place to another via teleport stations. Lexi enters a teleportation tournament—essentially an Amazing Race style tournament involving teleporting rather than air travel—to win prize money so she can enroll at a science academy and reunite with her best friend.

Unfortunately for Lexi, her teammates rather explore than focus on the tournament. As the race rages on through castles, museums, a labyrinth, and other locations throughout Europe and the U.S., Lexi has a difficult time keeping up with the competition and controlling her teammates. If she can’t figure out a way to work with her team, she can kiss that prize money good-bye.

In addition to puzzles that the reader can solve alongside Lexi, I really enjoy the friendship dynamic between Lexi, her teammates, and her best friend, and how that dynamic changes throughout the tournament!

Wow — sounds like a BLAST. Now, let’s get to the cover. Who did the art?

Charles Lehman of Shannon Associates did the cover. I can’t find him on Twitter, but you can check out his illustrations and other work here!

Before we let our readers check out the art, can you tell us what you thoughts when you first saw it?

It was funny because when we were brainstorming covers, I told my editor I was a fan of more abstract covers that didn’t necessarily contain depictions of the characters. She told me later on that the publisher decided to do the complete opposite and put Lexi and her teammates on the cover! I admit, I was nervous. Very nervous! But then I opened the graphic and immediately exhaled! I absolutely love how the characters turned out, and the entire cover screams fun and adventure. I love it!

All right — let’s not make them wait any longer. Here it is:

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Brilliant! So when can readers get their hands on the book?

LEXI MAGILL AND THE TELEPORTATION TOURNAMENT releases on October 1, 2019! It is available for pre-order now at your local bookstore, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble!

And where can they find more information about you?

My website is KimLongAuthor.com and I’m on twitter @KimLongMG.

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Kim Long loves to write stories with a sense of adventure, a dash of magic, and a hint of science. She wrote her first book at age 10, where she combined the best parts of her favorite Choose Your Own Adventures into a single story. (Cave of Time at Chimney Rock in the Bermuda Triangle.) When not writing, she loves playing board games, watching Star Wars movies, and riding her bike along Illinois’s many trails.

Join us for #MGBookMarch 2019!

Time for our 2nd annual #MGBookMarch!!

We hope you’ll join us on Twitter and Instagram to share and discuss your favorite middle grade books and celebrate supporters of MG.  Use the hashtag #MGBookMarch with your posts and pictures.  And we’re excited to see all your responses and connect with the MG community!

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Make sure to follow us on Twitter at @MG_BookBot for daily prompts and other great MG posts.

And if you have ideas for future prompts, please contact us here.

Happy reading!

-Corrina, Kathie & Jarrett

 

The Charm & Power of Fantasy

As a kid, I got an early start to reading. Not because I was some prodigy, I just wanted to do everything my big sister could. And anyway, I quickly discovered that I loved reading. Mom would send me to my room to clean it and find me hours later tucked in a messy corner with a book.

By the time I was picking my books out myself, a definite trend emerged. I loved The Book of Three. I was fascinated by A Wrinkle in Time. By the end of middle school, I’d read every single book in Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series. In early high school, I discovered Robin McKinley and never did fall out of love with her imagined worlds.

I think I was drawn to fantasy literature for a bunch of reasons. To escape? Sure. To have an adventure? Absolutely. Because dragons are super-cool? Yes. But also, the reality of everyday sexism hit middle-grade-me like a kick in the teeth. If you ask me, fantasy’s greatest power is its unique ability to expand our understanding of what’s possible. And I’m not just talking about portals and magicians and tesseracts.

If a writer is creative enough, those imagined worlds don’t need to share this world’s failings. Racism, sexism, homophobia—all of it can be transcended, or better yet, in the pages of a book, a reader can step into a world where they never even existed.

Or, speculative fiction can offer a razor-sharp critique of our society’s ills. The canon has a lot say about repression and bigotry, fascism and propaganda, bullies and the everyday final cover Lighthousekind of people who stand up to them. The Lighthouse between the Worlds is first and foremost a fast-paced adventure story with a good dose magic. But it also looks at the terrifying consequences of forfeiting independent thought. As much as it’s about hopping a portal between worlds, it’s also about the tension between isolationism and diverse coalitions—something we’re wrestling with today on a global scale.

I wish I could say that nothing got in the way of my love affair with fantasy lit. But that’s just not true. In those later high school years, in the doldrums of reading all those “important” required texts, I got the message that the stories I loved most weren’t worthwhile. I remember vividly one time when my lit teacher let us choose our own book for a report. And what did I pick? This long, boring book for adults about Aaron Burr. I hated that book the whole way through. So why did I pick it? Because I thought my history teacher would be impressed.

Before I knew it, I’d stopped reading fantasy. It wasn’t too much later that I’d stopped reading for fun altogether. How did that happen?

More and more, I see teachers online standing up for their students’ reading preferences, validating all kinds of readers and all sorts of texts, finding really creative ways to pair books to broaden learning, to build empathy, and to celebrate reading for reading’s sake. Educators are pushing back against practices that sap the joy out of reading. And every time I see that, I’m over here, fist-pumping, celebrating that those kids have a teacher like that in their corner.

Fast forward to my first year in college. I was in the University library attempting to study for a test on parasites. Yuck. I kept reading the same paragraph in my textbook over and over again, but remembering nothing, so I thought a change of location might help. What I discovered on the next floor up was a hip-high segment of bookshelves just for Children’s Literature. I remember sort of looking around, befuddled, like, what is this doing here with all the “important” books?

And then I spotted the spine of a book I’d know anywhere. It was The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley. I ditched my textbooks and spent the rest of the day joyfully immersed in that familiar story.

Now, I write books for all kinds of reasons. I’m hugely passionate about my YA historicals Audacity and An Uninterrupted View of the Sky. I’ve never had so much fun writing a novel as I did with last year’s middle grade contemporary, Three Pennies.

But there’s something special in it for me when I write a work of fantasy. It’s like I’m writing to that pre-teen me, right before she let herself be convinced that her favorite stories weren’t worthy. It’s like I’m reaching back through time to whisper in her ear: Look, this thing that brings you so much joy? Hold on tight. Don’t ever let it go. 

B&WMelanie Crowder is the acclaimed author of several books for young readers, including
AudacityThree Pennies, An Uninterrupted View of the Sky, A Nearer Moon and Parched, as well as the new middle grade duology The Lighthouse between the Worlds.  The sequel,A Way between Worlds, releases Oct. 1 of this year.

Melanie’s books have been awarded the Jefferson Cup, the Arnold Adoff Poetry Award, the SCBWI Crystal Kite, and the Bulletin Blue Ribbon; they have been recognized as a National Jewish Book Awards Finalist, Walden Award finalist, Colorado Book Awards Finalist, Junior Library Guild selection, YALSA Top Ten Books For Young Adults, ILA Notable Book for a Global Society, Parents’ Choice Silver Medal, BookBrowse Editor’s Choice, BookPage Top Pick, and The Washington Post Best Children’s Books for April. Her work has been listed as Best Books of the Year by Bank Street College, Kirkus Reviews, The Amelia Bloomer List, New York Public Library, Tablet Magazine, A Mighty Girl, and The Children’s Book Review.

The author lives under the big blue Colorado sky with a wife, two kids, and one good dog. Visit her online at www.melaniecrowder.com.

Interview: Kim Ventrella

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First off, Kim, thank you for stopping by the MG Book Village to celebrate the release of Bone Hollow and to chat about the book. Before we get to the new book, would you care to introduce yourself to our readers?

Thanks! I’m so excited to be here. First off, can I just say that the whole MG Book Village crew is totally amazing! Second, a little about me. I’m a lover of weird, whimsical stories of all kinds. And dogs! My dog is definitely my best friend! 🙂 I’ve held a variety of interesting jobs, including children’s librarian, scare actor, Peace Corps volunteer, French instructor and overnight staff at a women’s shelter, but my favorite job title is author. My first book, Skeleton Tree, came out in 2017, and I’m super excited for the release of Bone Hollow!

Okay, on to the book – Bone Hollow. Can you tell us a little about it? 

As you can probably tell from the titles, Skeleton Tree and Bone Hollow share a similar aesthetic. They are set in the same world, but Bone Hollow is actually a stand-alone novel featuring a brand-new set of characters.

In Bone Hollow, readers will meet 12-year-old Gabe and his dog, Ollie. Gabe does his best to please his guardian, Miss Cleo, even if she does prefer her prize-winning chickens to him or his dog. When Miss Cleo’s favorite chicken gets stuck on the roof during a storm, Gabe knows he has no choice but to rescue it. It’s either that, or get kicked out of Miss Cleo’s house for good.

He climbs up, despite the wind, and the rain and the angry clouds that are just about screaming, Tornado!

Next thing Gabe knows, he’s falling.

He wakes up in a room full of tearful neighbors. It’s almost as if they think he’s dead. But Gabe’s not dead. He feels fine! So why do they insist on holding a funeral? And why does everyone scream in terror when Gabe shows up for his own candlelight vigil?

Scared and bewildered, Gabe flees with Ollie, the only creature who doesn’t tremble at the sight of him. When a mysterious girl named Wynne offers to let Gabe stay at her cozy house in a misty clearing, he gratefully accepts. Yet Wynne disappears from Bone Hollow for long stretches of time, and when a suspicious Gabe follows her, he makes a mind-blowing discovery. Wynne is Death and has been for over a century. Even more shocking . . . she’s convinced that Gabe is destined to replace her.

Your books tend to have spooky elements—all these bones and skeletons. Would you describe your books as scary?

I love, love scary stories! But I like to think of Skeleton Tree and Bone Hollow as spooky, rather than scary. They certainly have macabre elements, but they fit much more in the arena of magical realism or contemporary fantasy than horror. I love to sprinkle a little spookiness into heartfelt, sometimes sad, stories that focus on characters going through difficult times, but ultimately coming out with a renewed sense of hope in the end.

I do have a scary story coming out though, yay! Jonathan Maberry is editing a reboot of the Scary Stories franchise, called New Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (set to release in 2020), and I am super excited to have a very scary short story in that collection called ‘Jingle Jangle.’

You helped launch Spooky Middle Grade, a “ghoulish group of middle grade authors that believe spooky books can be read all year long.” How did that all come about?

It was a dark and stormy night. Thirteen strangers arrived at a haunted mansion… Okay, maybe it wasn’t quite so dramatic. Basically, I stumbled upon a Facebook ‘support’ group that had just been created for spooky MG authors. I joined, we started talking, we all got really excited about spreading the joy of spooky stories, and the rest is history. My favorite part of the group is that we’ve found a meaningful way to connect with students through our free Skype visits, and I feel like we’re having a positive impact and hopefully inspiring a whole new generation of spooky writers.

Can you tell us about the multiple-person Skype visits the Spooky MG crew offers, and also how interested educators and librarians can set one up?

Absolutely! I have teamed up with, at last count, thirteen spooky middle grade authors to offer free Skype Q&As to schools across the country. We have done over fifty since November! The response has been tremendous. Each Skype visit features four spooky authors, and we answer students’ burning questions about writing, publishing, our pets. You name it. Bonus feature: if your students have leftover questions, we’ll answer those in a video on our new YouTube channel. To sign up for your free Skype (or Google Hangout), head over to https://spookymiddlegrade.com/free-skype-qa/.

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Speaking of librarians – before you became a full-time writer, you were a children’s service manager for a public library system, right? Did that work inform or influence your work as an author in any way?

I was! I have been a children’s and/or teen librarian for most of the past ten years (when I wasn’t in the Peace Corps 🙂 ). My favorite part of being a librarian was actually leading programs for young people, because I got to do everything from science experiments, to Doctor Who parties, to Minecraft Club and on and on. It was the perfect outlet for my artsy side, and, of course, I also had the pleasure of connecting young people to great books. In terms of informing my work, being a librarian definitely helped me build a strong knowledge of children’s literature, and it also gave me the opportunity to see first-hand what gets kids excited about reading.

Before I let you go, let’s get back to the new book, and to a few of the questions I try to ask all our guests. What do you hope your readers – in particular the young ones – take away from Bone Hollow?

Mostly, I hope they enjoy traveling along with Gabe and Ollie as they enter the mysterious world of Bone Hollow. On a more serious note, I’m always wanting readers to come away with a new perspective on life or, in this case, death. Like with Skeleton Tree, I’ve tried to create an engaging fantasy world filled with humor, whimsy and many light touches, but I’m also wanting to explore darker topics to show that there can be light and beauty there as well. Loss is one of those things that even very young children encounter, often with the loss of a pet or grandparent, and one of my goals is to help young readers develop a framework for processing their feelings surrounding death that acknowledges the sadness, but also opens the door to hope.

Many of our site’s readers are teachers of Middle Grade-aged kids. Is there anything you’d like to say to them – in particular those planning to add Bone Hollow to their classroom libraries?

I strive to always make myself available to teachers and librarians in any way I can. I love connecting with students and, if you have an idea for a way that we can collaborate, please, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

Where can readers find more information about you and your work?

Readers can visit my website: https://kimventrella.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/kimventrella

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kimventrella/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kimventrella/

One final thing: to celebrate my book birthday, I’m having a BIG giveaway for teachers and librarians! To enter to win a classroom set of Skeleton Tree and 5 copies of Bone Hollow, head over to my Twitter account!

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IMG_4560.jpgKIM VENTRELLA is the author of the middle grade novels Skeleton Tree (2017) and Bone Hollow (2019, Scholastic Press), and she is a contributor to the upcoming New Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark anthology (2020, HarperCollins). Her works explore difficult topics with big doses of humor, whimsy and hope. Kim has held a variety of interesting jobs, including children’s librarian, scare actor, Peace Corps volunteer, French instructor and overnight staff at a women’s shelter, but her favorite job title is author. She lives in Oklahoma City with her dog and co-writer, Hera. Find out more at https://kimventrella.com/ or follow Kim on Twitter and Instagram: @KimVentrella.

 

Novels About Loss and Hope & a Conversation with Laura Shovan: Books Between, Episode 69

Episode Outline:

Listen to the episode here!

Intro

Hi everyone and welcome to Books Between – a podcast for teachers, parents, librarians, and anyone who wants to connect kids between 8-12 to books they’ll love.  I’m your host, Corrina Allen – a teacher of 21, a mom of two, and enjoying the last few hours of our Winter Break here in Central New York. We’ve had ice storms then sun and lots of time to read.

This is episode #69 and today I’m discussing four excellent middle grade novels that deal with grief and loss. And I’m also sharing with you a conversation I had with Laura Shovan about her latest book Takedown.

Book Talk – Four Novels About Loss and Hope

In this segment, I share with you a selection of books centered around a theme and discuss three things to love about each book. I happened to read these four books back-to-back without realizing how profoundly connected they were. They have completely different plots and one is even sci/fi / speculative fiction – but each novel features a main character who is dealing with loss in one form or another. In two of the novels, that loss is the death of a parent. And in two of the novels, that loss includes a parent dealing with mental illness and trauma themselves. A loss of another – a loss of what was once considered normal life.  The books this week are: The Science of Breakable Things, The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole, The Simple Art of Flying, and The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise.

The Science of Breakable Things

The first book I want to share with you and one that I hope makes its way into your collection is Tae Keller’s debut novel The Science of Breakable Things. The lead in this 51ajbKs7r7L._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_story is 7th grader Natalie who’s life has been turned upside down as she and her father are learning how to navigate her mother’s depression – the “situation” as her dad calls it that has her mom holed up in her bedroom and not able to cook, work, or keep up any of the routines and traditions that had kept their family together. At the beginning of the school year, Natalie’s science teacher has challenged them all to use the power of the scientific method to explore a question that intrigues you and study it with all your heart. Well – the question that tugs at Natalie’s heart?  How can I inspire my mother to break out of her depression? And along the way Natalie teams up with Twig (her exuberant best friend) and Dari (their new serious lab partner) to enter an egg-drop contest hoping to use the prize money for a scheme to jumpstart her mother out of her depression. Here are three things to love about Tae Keller’s The Science of Breakable Things:

  1. How the story is laid out with the steps of the Scientific Method! Step One: Observe, Step Two: Question, Step Three: Investigative Research and so on.  It’s a clever way to structure the story and have you predicting what those Results will be!
  2. The illustrations and footnotes! Oh am I such a sucker for a good footnote – especially funny ones and this novel has over fifty of these little gems!
  3. Natalie’s visits with her therapist, Dr. Doris – and Natalie’s resistance to falling for her “Therapist Tricks” and Natalie’s eventual shift to being more open with her. I think a lot of kids will be able relate to those begrudging trips to a counselor, and I hope some other children might see a glimpse into the help a therapist can offer.

There is so much more to this book than just those things – like Natalie’s relationship with her Korean grandmother and her growning interest in their shared culture and the break-down of her relationship with her friend Mikayala. Here is one of my favorite quotes – one that captures the blend of science and hope in this book. This is from a section right after Natalie, Twig, and Dari have been experimenting with magnets. “It’s funny how the cold magnets actually worked best. It’s like how perennial plants seem to die in the winter but really, they’re just waiting till everything is all right again. Maybe it’s not such a surprise that there’s strength in the cold. Maybe sometimes the strongest thing of all is knowing that one day you’ll be alright again, and waiting and waiting until you can come out into the sun.”

For kids who are waiting for those in their lives to come out into the sun, The Science of Breakable Things is a fabulous book to offer.

The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole

Our next book today is The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole by Michelle Cuevas – author of several picture books and the middle grade Confessions of an Imaginary Friend which I now must pick up immediately! The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole is one of 51Z9DmMHO9L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_those books that I kept bumping into. I’d see it on display at the library, friends kept raving about it, it popped up on my “Related to Items You Viewed” on Amazon. It’s like it was stalking me. Like, in a nice, bookish way. The way where all the the forces of the universe seem to nudge you to read something. And well – the forces of the universe were right about this quirky, moving, wonderfully weird little book. It’s about eleven-year-old Stella Diaz whose father has recently died. Together they shared a love of science – and silly jokes. But remembering him after his death has become painful. In the first pages of the book, she decides to give NASA the only recording of her father’s laugh – to put on the Golden Record headed out on the Voyager spacecraft. Instead, a black hole follows her home and it becomes Stella’s pet – consuming everything it touches. And at first, Stella is happy to toss in those things that cause her annoyance (Brussel Sprouts) or cause her painful memories (like the recording of her father).  And then the black hole devours her 5-year-old brother, Cosmo, and Stella has to venture inside that darkness to save him and confront all the other things she’d tossed inside. I loved this book – and here are three (of many!) reasons why:

  1. It’s hilarious! Like – Stella names the black hole “Larry” – short for “Singularity” and the scenes with the smelly classroom hamster Stinky Stu. And the Dog With No Name. And all the things that Larry gets up to when he gets loose in the neighborhood! Yes – this novel is about loss and grief and there are times when you’re probably going to cry. But to me, that edge between laughing and tears is a powerful place. And this book does it so well.
  2. The clever use of black and white pages – and Stella’s Captain Log documenting her journey in the black hole.
  3. Lines like this one: “It’s like the stars in our constellations that we made,” you said. “Even if one star dies far, far away, its light is still visible, and the constellation it helped to make remains. A thing can be gone and still be your guide.”

The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole is charming, gorgeously written – and funnier than you’d ever think. If you have kids who like science, who like funny books, who are up for something unique – then this is a novel they’ll love. And if you have a child learning how to grapple with their black hole – this might be the book they need.

The Simple Art of Flying

Another fantastic book that was just released this past week is The Simple Art of Flying by debut author Cory Leonardo. It’s about a young cherry-loving African Grey parrot, 51AJBJgG1cL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_Alastair, who was born in the back room of a pet shop – along with his sister, Aggie. Alastair is…grumpy, suspicious, stubborn, and intensly loyal to his sister – and set on finding a way for them both to escape together to a land of blue skies and palm trees.  But that dream gets a lot harder to pull off when each of them are adopted by two different people. Alastair ends up with an elderly but very active widow named Albertina Plopky who organizes “Polka with Pets” events and writes letters to her deceased husband. And Aggie is bought by 12-year-old-Fritz, an attentive, sweet, and serious boy who is dealing with his own loses. So here are three things to love about Cory Leonardo’s The Simple Art of Flying:

  1. How this story is told from three different points of view and in three different formats which helps us triangulate what’s happening. Alastair’s sections are in prose and in poetry. He likes to chew on books with poetry being his favorite so has taken to creating his own versions of famous poems he’s read. Bertie’s sections are letters to her husband, Everett. And Fritz’s parts are a medical log.
  2. Alastair’s poetry!!! And… the chapter with the goldfish was unexpected and…brilliant!
  3. Bertie’s letter to Fritz at the end of the book – all about cherries and life and what to do on those days when it feels like everything is the pits.

The Simple Art of Flying is a gorgeously sweet book that’s a little bit like The One and Only Ivan with a touch of Because of Winn-Dixie.

The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise

Our final book this week is the latest from Dan Gemeinhart – who you may know from The Honest Truth, Good Dog, or Scar Island. His novels are perennial favorites in our 51tWs3-k1nL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_class and guaranteed heart-tuggers – and The Remarkble Journey of Coyote Sunrise is, I think, my favorite of all. And that’s saying something – every one of his books are incredible!  This story starts at a hot gas station where our main girl, called Coyote, walks in alone – and leaves with a watermelon slushie and a white and gray striped fluff of a kitten. A kitten she has to hide from her father – the man she only refers to as Rodeo. Five years ago Coyote’s mother and sisters were killed in an accident and since then she and her father have left behind their home, their memories (or any talk of them) and have been living in an old converted school bus traveling the country. And never ever looking back. But during Coyote’s weekly phone call to her grandmother back in Washington State, Coyote learns something that launches her on a secret mission to get the bus headed back home (without Rodeo realizing it!) so she can keep a promise. On her journey there are mishaps and new travelers joining them and more secrets revealed. There are so many reasons to love this book there’s no way to list them all, but here are three:

  1. Coyote. This girl has so much charm and love and generosity wrapped around a core of pain and hurt. She’s gentle with her father – even when he doesn’t deserve it. She names her cat Ivan from The One and Only Ivan.  She reminds me a bit of Anne Shirley from the Anne of Green Gables books. You just want to ber her friend.
  2. Coyote’s friendship with Salvador – a boy who ends up on the bus with them with his mother. I love how they gently push each other in a better direction. And Coyote does something for Salvador that is one of the kindest, sweetest, gestures.
  3. Rodeo. Here’s how Coyote describes him. “That man is hopeless. He is wild and broken and beautiful and hanging on by a thread, but it’s a heckuva thread and he’s holding it tight with both hands and his heart.”

The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise was a book that shredded my heart and then somehow stitched it back together stonger than before. I think it’s Gemeinhart’s best yet.

Laura Shovan – Interview Outline

DSC_5879-200x300Our special guest this week is Laura Shovan – author of the novel in verse The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary and her most recent middle grade book – Takedown. This conversation actually took place last summer but due to some techinical difficulties on my end, it took me until now to bring it to you.  But, it was worth the wait. Laura and I chat about the inspiration behind her novel, the world of girls’ wrestling, donuts, bullet journaling, among lots of other things. And don’t forget that when you are done reading the book and you want to hear Laura and I discuss the ending of Takedown, just wait until the end of the show after the credits and that bonus section will be waiting for you.

Take a listen…

Takedown

Your new middle grade novel, Takedown, was just released this past June – can you tell us a bit about it?

I love books that immerse me in a subculture!  Like Roller Girl, and the Irish dancing in Kate Messner’s The Seventh Wish – I was so fascinated to learn about wrestling moves and the tournament process. I’ve heard you mention that your son wrestled and that 51lhPg+K-oL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_close knowledge of the sport clearly comes through.  When did you know you wanted to bring wrestling into a story and did you do any extra research to bring this story to life?

There were so many small moments in the book that highlight what a “boys’ club” the wrestling world is – all the trophies have boys at the top of them, all the refs at all the tournaments (including the girls wrestling tournament) are men – and even Mickey’s supportive coach uses gendered languages and calls the team “guys” and “boys.”  At some point it occured to me… yes, this book is about wrestling, but maybe it might help kids see how male-focused other aspects of the world are?

One of the aspects that I really connect to was the Delgado family dynamics of Mickey and her older brothers Cody and Evan. And how their relationship with each other changed when the oldest, Evan, wasn’t around.

I’m coming to realize that dual perspective novels are some of my favorites. And you were masterful at those subtle time shifts to build that suspense!  What was your process like to make Mickey’s voice distinct from Lev’s?

You deserve a donut for this amazing book!  What’s your favorite?

So, as a fellow bullet journaler, did I see that you offer bullet journaling CLASSES?

Your Writing Life

How was writing Takedown different than writing The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary?

Your Reading Life

One of the goals of this podcast is to help educators and librarians and parents inspire kids to read more and connect them with amazing books.  Did you have a special teacher or librarian who helped foster your reading life as a child?

What were some of your most influential reads as a child?

What have you been reading lately that you’ve liked?

Before you go – you posted a video of you calling your reps last year. I just want to say thank you for inspiring me to make those phone calls and to keep calling….

Thank You!

**BONUS SPOILER SECTION: Laura and I discuss the ending of the novel, and if you’d like to hear that conversation, I moved that part of the recording to after the end credits of today’s episode at the 52:38 mark.

LINKS:

Laura’s website – https://laurashovan.com

Laura on Twitter

Wrestle Like A Girl

Dough Donuts

Laura Shovan on Bullet Journaling

BOOKS WE CHATTED ABOUT

A Child’s Garden of Verses (Robert Louis Stevensen)

The Chronicles of Narnia (C.S. Lewis)

The Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame)

Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë)

The Warriors Series (Erin Hunter)

Howard Wallace: Sabotage Stage Left (Casey Lyall)

Drawn Together (Minh Lê and Dan Santat)

The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness (Sy Montgomery)

Giants Beware!, Dragons Beware! and Monsters Beware! (Jorge Aguirre and Rafael Rosado)

The Colors of the Rain (R.L.Toalson)

Closing

Thank you so much for joining me this week.  You can find an outline of interviews and a full transcript of all the other parts of our show at MGBookVillage.org.   And, if you have an extra minute this week, reviews on iTunes or Stitcher are much appreciated.

Books Between is a proud member of the Lady Pod Squad and the Education Podcast Network. This network features podcasts for educators, created by educators. For more great content visit edupodcastnetwork.com

Talk with you soon!  Bye!

CorrinaAllen

Corrina Allen is a 5th grade teacher in Central New York and mom of two energetic tween girls. She is passionate about helping kids discover who they are as readers.

 

 

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Cover Reveal: CARDSLINGER, M.G. Velasco

COVER_REVEAL

The MG Book Village has been fortunate enough to host a number of wonderful cover reveals in the year or so since we’ve launched. Today’s reveal, however, is extra special.

M.G. Velasco approached us about hosting his reveal a while back, but being the awesome, thoughtful person he is, insisted we hold off until he’d had a chance to share the cover art with his #KidsNeedMentors class, taught by 6th grade ELA teacher Ginger Schwartz — he wanted them to be the first ones to lay their eyes on it. (To learn more about the #KidsNeedMentors, click here and here.) Then M.G. had an even more awesome, thoughtful idea — to put the kids of his #KidsNeedMentors class in charge of his whole cover reveal interview! They’re his audience, his future readers — it makes more sense for them to be in charge of the questions than for me to be!

Below is a little more info about M.G.’s upcoming debut, Cardslinger, and below that the interview by Ms. Schwartz’s students, and below that the big reveal!

A dangerous quest, a lost treasure, and the card game that started it all.

It’s 1881, and a newfangled card game called Mythic is sweeping the nation. Twelve-year-old Jason “Shuffle” Jones doesn’t like it. He and his father created the game for themselves, before his father went missing. Mythic should have disappeared with him. But when Shuffle discovers a clue in a pack of Mythic cards, he sets out on a quest to find his dad. Along the way he clashes with a devious card swindler, an epic twister, and the ruthless bounty hunter Six-Plum Skylla and her gang. As he gets closer to the truth, will he turn tail or push all-in to become a real hero?”

~ Jarrett

. . .

Why did you decide to become a writer? What made you want to write books?

Ah, this answer can be a whole blog post in its own… But the short of it is: I write because my story ideas must go somewhere, and without that creative outlet, my head would go nuclear. But it’s more than a release, it’s pure joy. I get to play with words and craft them into a story, likely with explosions. The characters are mine, running wild in my world and getting into all sorts of mischief. The story is an extension of me, and every time one swirls in my head and leaks onto the page, it’s amazing.

Is it hard to be a writer?

Only if you don’t love it. Writing can be difficult and frustrating. It’s mostly done in solitude with nothing but the words in your head and the screen blinking at your face. Sometimes you can’t find the right words and the page remains blank. There are days when nothing seems to get done and you feel like you’ll never reach the end. There will be people who won’t love your characters and stories, and you’ll feel like such a loser. But with all that gloom, there’s always the good. The words will flow and it’ll feel great. People will “get” what you right, and that writer-reader connection is worth more than gold. In order to take the good with the bad, the easy with the difficult, you have to love writing, and then all the time and effort and difficulty will be worth it.

How did you get the idea for Cardslinger?

I wanted to write an adventure story about a kid who loves to play games. I was into a card game called Magic: The Gathering at the time, and that kind of game seemed perfect for the story. It became a Western because of its wild and free setting, but instead of gunfights at high noon, there are card game duels. Also, Homer’s The Odyssey played a big part in my idea, and classical mythology fit naturally with the time period. It was their Harry Potter of their day, maybe.

How long is the book?

Well, according to the ARC (Advance Reader Copy) pdf it is 58 chapters and 348 pages. It’s an epic read, but trust me, it’s worth it. 😉

Is there a sequel to Cardslinger?

In my head there is.

What would you write about in your free time?

Anything fun, typically something with explosions.

How long did it take for you to write Cardslinger?

For the first draft. Maybe three months. For the polished manuscript. Three years.

In Cardslinger, who is your favorite character and why?

Really? I have to chose a favorite? If I must, it has to be Shuffle. He’s a gamer. He uses his smarts instead of his fists to get out of a bad situation. He thinks about strategy and gaming. He loves his family and friends. He’s kinda funny, too.

What is your favorite book?

The one I’m currently reading. 😉 Of all time? I would say a Roald Dahl book, maybe James and the Giant Peach. Or his collection of hilariously, dark fairy tales and short stories: Revolting Rhymes.

Do you write in silence, or do you have background noise?

First drafts are usually done in silence. Revisions are done with music.

Do you write everyday?

Yes. Sometimes it’s only a hundred words. Sometimes two-thousand. If I’m not writing, I’m editing.

Who is your favorite author?

Roald Dahl.

How do you plan your book?

I’ll come up with a character or a story. Then the plot, which I’ll draft in a three-act line graph of sorts. I’ll outline it, then come up with an early synopsis of the main story points. One of the biggest parts of planning a book is the character creation. All the characters need to be well-rounded and developed before they see the page. Their traits and flaws, likes/dislikes, family and friends, strengths and weaknesses need to be realized. Once I have a good cast of characters and a decent plot, I hash out a first draft, which will eventually be cut up, hammered, added-to, and molded into something, hopefully, you’ll read and enjoy.

Thank you, Ms. Schwartz and students, for the fun interview! It’s a joy to reflect on being an author.

And now, for the cover:

Cardslinger_4CoverReveal.jpg

I would be remiss not to mention the wonderful illustrator who crafted the amazing cover art, Mónica Armiño. I love how ominous it is. The storm. The bandits coming out of the landscape. The Zeus cloud! She hit the details perfectly, with the color of the card backs, Atalanta’s braids and yellow scarf. And Katana, the black cat, is the best! If you love this cover, you can find other fantastic art by Ms. Armiño at
www.monicaarmino.com.

And big thank you to Laura Westlund and Kim Morales and the design team at Carolrhoda/Lerner books. It couldn’t have come together so beautifully without y’all. Giddyup!